New book stuff

 

 

 

 

 

µ                  General history

o                                            anecdotes of Indians v. Chinese in gold camps
January 23, 1850 San Francisco's second daily journal, "The Journal of Commerce," established by Washington Bartlett
.

o                                             

 

 

µ                                                                                       Things Anglo

q                      Barbary coast notes:

 the "deadfalls," as the low beer and dance cellars are designated, which line both sides of the street, and abound on all the streets in this vicinity, come echoes of drunken laughter, curses, ribaldry, and music from every conceivable instrument.

Hand-organs, flutes, pianos, bagpipes, banjos, guitars, violins, brass instruments and accordeons mingle their notes and help to swell the discord. "Dixie" is being drummed out of a piano in one cellar; in the next they are singing "John Brown;" and in the next, "Clare's Dragoons," or "Wearing of the Green." Women dressed in flaunting colors stand at the doors of many of these "deadfalls," and you frequently notice some of them saluting an acquaintance, perhaps of an hour's standing, and urging him to "come back and take just one more drink." Ten to one the already half-drunken fool complies, and finds himself in the calaboose next morning, with a broken head, utterly empty pockets, and a dim recollection of having been taken somewhere by some woman whom he cannot identify, and finding himself unexpectedly in the clutches of men be never saw before, who go through him like a policeman, taking from him watch, chain, and every other valuable, and pitch him headlong down a stairway; after which all is a blank in his memory.

All these dens are open and in full blast, yet we see few persons going in or out who appear like customers, and they do not seem to be selling lager or whisky enough to pay for gaslight. Look in the papers tomorrow morning, and you will see items like this:

ROBBED ON THE BARBARY COAST.–John Smith, a miner from Mud Springs, El Dorado County, came down on the Sacramento boat last evening, and put up at the What Cheer House. On his way to the hotel, he made the acquaintance of a man who claimed to know a friend of his who had worked with him at mining in 1858, on the south fork of the Yuba. The two started out in search of this mythical friend, and visited numerous deadfalls without finding him. They drank at each place they visited, however, and about one o'clock this morning Smith reached the calaboose in a half- stupefied condition, and charged a girl known as "Pigeon-toed-Sal," whose headquarters are in a deadfall near the corner of Kearny and Pacific streets, and her male confederate, with robbing him of $800, her companion holding him down while she searched his pockets, and took the money from them. Officers Smith and Brown arrested Sal and her confederate, the "Billy Goat,"

with the bar stocked with well-drugged liquors–which to taste is to look death in the face and defy him–on one side of the front room, a sofa on the other, and at the rear an arched opening hung with tawdry red and white curtains, communicating with an inner room,

 

 

New book stuff

 

 

µ                What does Hung Muhn mean? P. 321

µ               Chnge Chang to Kwan Yueh?

µ               How does pendant get from Peking to Jee Shim?

o                                            anecdotes of Indians v. Chinese in gold camps. Indians disliked dogs and Chinese.

o                                            January 23, 1850 San Francisco's second daily journal, "The Journal of Commerce,"

o                                            Muskrat Bone’s blue eyes

o                                            Anecdotes chap. 9, book 1?¿

o                                            bowls of brewed medicinal plants, notably… what plants/herbs??????????  Chap 10 p364

 

o                                            the cool blueness of the jade, when the old man suddenly sat up and reached out to close his hand over Tai Ying’s. “Eagle fits only to Eagle,” Tai-Tai whispered  chap 10 p364

o                                            NEED BKGND ON CHAN?¿  chap. 10, p364

 

o                                                        WHERE IS THE BKGNDFOR TY BEING IN FOSHAN?  Chapter 11

 

4                                                        Star-in-Moon: mourn for three years. She cut off all her hair, smeared her head and face with pitch. Her shorn hair was made into a belt and around her neck she wore a leather thong covered with pitch lumps.  

4                                                         

o                                              Did you talk to ‘The Monkey’ on your trip to Tung An?”

     Lien-Ying couldn’t have been more astonished if his father had declared himself a closet Kazakh transvestite.

But when Lao-Ying reached into his fur to withdraw a leather thong from around his neck, his son nearly passed out to see

 

Ø      Tai-tai’s bkgnd: fugitive to merchant to old age??

Ø      After the Chico incident T-Y is called in with assignment to protect Chinese interests in the case, and to stop aggression against Chinese in mines by Indians. He is intended to fail, thus bringing wrath of whites on Chinese. But T-Y is denounced as a renegade bandit stiffing up Indian trouble. This siphons some of the whites anger toward Chinese and gives them a target to blame for Indian trouble.

 

šBELONGS WITH CHAPTER ON FINAL BATTLE AT MAACHOATCHE?¿

The ethnic group most persecuted in the States were the Native Americans. However, only on the West Coast did racial violence bear the traits of organized battles coordinated by State government troops and civilians.

It was easy to recruit men for the hunt. By 1849 California Native territories were over-run by gold seekers and accompanying settlers already imbued with hatred for Indians. Conflicts were inevitable as the Euro-Americans coveted more and more of the Natives’ lands and traditional Indian food sources grew scarce.

In 1850, the Federal government attempted to end the conflict between the Indians and the whites by creating treaties. The Indians were guaranteed 7.5 million acres (about a quarter of the State) so that they could continue with their way of life.

Almost immediately after the Federal Treaty of 1851, the Governor decided to oppose any law that gave Indians exclusive rights to land high in gold bearing quartz or arable land valuable to the settlers and farmers. One year later, the Federal Senate secretly rejected all the treaties, and instituted a system of small reserves where the Native population was to be controlled by Federal troops and State militia. LIMITATIONS PLACED ON THE INDIANS….

The California State government took an exceptionally powerful and bi-polar interest in Indian affairs. It was the old theme of higher morality vs. economics of the day. Constitutional ideals clashed with the business interests that ran the legislature. The principles of commercial expedience and public perception remained harmonious and unconflicted, however.

The State Constitution outlawed slavery outright, but the first legislature immediately enacted Chapter 133, a law that worked like the “Black Codes” of the South, as well as numerous treaties regarding land dispute.

Chapter 133 claimed to be a law for the protection of the Indians. What it really did was enable whites to grab any unemployed Indian or orphan and indenture them on ranches, homes and mines. The law also declared that the natives labor without wage, it defined a special class of crimes and punishments for them, and made their testimony (as well as that of the Chinese) inadmissible in courts.

Indians of all ages were indentured to any white citizen for long periods of time, a common practice from 1850 to 1863. Or a farmer’s wife or miner or any trail scruff could just forego all that onery paperwork and put in their order for children and girls with the many American and Mexican slave traders plying the countryside and mountains.

The vaqueros used to go up to what is now Ukiah and ride in among the Indian rancherias and drive out the boys and girls, leaving the mothers behind and killing the bucks if they offered any resistance. Then they would herd the captives down like so many cattle and sell them to the ranchers. About $100 was the standard price. A good girl would bring that, but some sold for as little as $50.

Often the “owners” kept the food supply so short that the Indians starved. Similar to the Mexican peons and Chinese wage workers, the Indians made white miners economically jealous of the advantage the Indians provided to their masters. In southern California, this law allowed the continuation and expansion of the peonage system of the Mexican rancheros to secure labor supply on the cattle ranches. In northern California, the law modified the peonage system into something close to slave work forces in mines and on farms.

By the summer of 1859, the Indians in Mendocino County and the northern part of the state faced the utter destruction of their culture. They not only had to kill livestock to keep from starving, but had to resort to beggary as well. They began to loiter about the settlements, becoming public nuisances.

The good Christian citizens of Mendocino County elected a grand jury, which demanded in a report to the state legislature that the government should rid the county of the "miserable half-starved creatures prowling about and infesting every neighborhood, greatly to the damage and annoyance of our citizens."

Those “problem” natives occupying territories deemed desirable were dealt with in profoundly barbarous fashion. Scores of State-subsidized military campaigns were funded, targeting Indian communities considered threatening to white settlements. These expeditions had two objectives: to exterminate the target or forcibly remove entire populations from their homelands and place them in fenced enclosures guarded by Federal troops.

Many ranch and townfolk joined in the hunt, as bounties were placed on Indian hair and head. Crowds of drunken men drove hundreds of Indian families from their homes in the dead of winter. Under State law, those same men could not be prosecuted in that violation (or any other, except selling liquor to Indians).

State newspapers commonly reported cases of rape and forced concubinage in the mining districts during the 1850’s. The Daily N. California reported many assaults on Trinity County Indians. One read, “There is a class of men who, when not able to obtain a squaw by fair means of payment, would drag off the squaw and knock down her friends if they interfere. Indian women in these parts must often flee to the mountains to avoid the violence of men who, under the influence of strong drink, will not hesitate to do any deed.”

In the quarter century between 1845 and 1870, the California Indian population declined from approximately 300,000 to 30,000. Soldiers, ranchers, miners, and towns people often fought side-by-side in these genocidal campaigns against Native Americans. White attacks, epidemics, forced labor, starvation, and kidnapping had largely destroyed Native American communities. 

 

q       Post-chapter 9: Yana escapes with larger band, makes her way back to Tschastas TO gather forces with aChumoc, yahi, maidu

Yana, organizes search-and-destroy missions Concow Maidu from the placer-mining section of the Sacramento Valley on the Feather and American rivers, The Pit River Atsugewi, the Pomo of Clear Lake and Little Lake

š     

 


 



A group of poor men hold signs given to them by eugenics supporters on Wall Street (NY)

Copyright 1997 State Historical Society of Wisconsin

 

Eugenics

The "science" of eugenics claimed that heredity determined cultural and social patterns and, hence, that selective human breeding would advance civilization. Many Americans seized on eugenics to rationalize "scientifically" their racism. Since many Americans already assumed that southeastern Europeans, African-Americans, Jews, Asians, Middle Easterners, and American Indians were of "inferior" blood, eugenics simply gave them "scientific proof" that these "inferiors" were causing America's social problems.

One leading proponent of eugenics theory was Dr. Charles Benedict Davenport. Davenport argued that weaknesses in society were due to the unnatural preservation, by the use of modern medicine, of the "feeble-minded" and "unfit." In his 1911 book, Heredity in Relation to Eugenics, written at a time when Italians, Poles, Greeks, Russians and Jews were the targets of anti-immigrant phobia, he held that "the population of the United States will, on account of the great influx of blood from South-eastern Europe, rapidly become darker in pigmentation, smaller in stature, more mercurial, more attached to music and art, [and] more given to crimes of larceny, kidnapping, assault, murder, rape and sex-immorality" and that "the ratio of insanity in the population will rapidly increase." Advocates of the new "science" of eugenics, however, called for more than simple immigration restriction. Scientists, politicians, and others relied upon the "evidence" of heredity to advocate such drastic measures as sterilization, controlled breeding, institutionalization, and even executions of the feeble. People often associate such measures with Nazi Germany and Hitler's methods of "racial purification." Yet, proponents of eugenics and "racial purity" also enjoyed a great deal of popular support in the United States during the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Political philosopher Francis A. Walker was a leading proponent of immigration restriction at the end of the nineteenth century. An article he wrote for the Atlantic Monthly in 1896 indicates his general belief that immigrants not of "Anglo-Saxon" origin were of inferior stock and threatened the social, political, and economic well-being of the nation:

"The problems which so sternly confront us to-day are serious enough without being complicated and aggravated by the addition of some millions of Hungarians, Bohemians, Poles, south Italians, and Russian Jews."--Francis A. Walker, The Atlantic Monthly; June, 1896; "Restriction of Immigration"; Volume 77, No. 464; pages 822-829

Click here to see the rest of this article by Francis A. Walker.

 

·                                                                        

 

THE POINT:

 

In The History of The Great Light Huai-Nan-Tzu presents his teachings in the paradoxical method adopted by Lao-Tzu in The Simple Way, using as illustrations the common things of everyday life, suggesting, by means of contrast and analogy, the inner realities of Tao, the balance of the masculine and the feminine, the balance of the light and the dark, and the sublime virtues of the soul when it is united to Tao. Thus the moral of the teachings is within the comprehension of the most simple, while the mode of life which they advocate may be practised by all. Their very simplicity, however, veils an inner depth of meaning which can only be fully revealed when union with Tao has been attained.

 

The aim of Taoist teachings is to free man from attachments to all that is transient, thus enabling him both to use and to enjoy all things to the fullest possible extent by assigning them to their proper place in his life.

A body kept fit and healthy by proper exercise and diet can, however, help in the accomplishment of the soul's purpose;

But until his spiritual nature is unfolded, man identifies himself with his body and the material world, and these obscure his real Self and prevent him from realizing his true nature: thus he is not conscious of his essential immortality.

 

TAO

Wise and balanced people of TAO are always tranquil and without desiring; they are always content, and have no cares. The Sky is their canopy, the Earth is their vehicle, the four seasons give them power. Perfectly free and knowing no restraints, they advance through the Empyrean; moving slowly or quickly as they wish. They cause the rain to sprinkle moisture on the roads and the wind to sweep the dust; lightening serves to drive them when lagging and thunder provides a path where there was none. Above they roam through the vastness of space; below they pass through the Gate of Boundlessness.

 

·        AN ENDING: Abandon all social and egoistic pretenses: they are short-lived, have little profundity, and nothing for our evolution. If you understand force of the female residing within your universal potential, if you can envision why  awakened men and women join, and have the motivation to follow a life-time path of Higher Union, then I want to know you. On the other hand, if you haven’t moved beyond getting your emotions in balance, and way past the stifling and retarding limitations of the economics of sexual politics, please don’t respond to this.

     This is not about ‘candles and moonlit dinners’ or romanticism based only in       

     emotions; this assumes that romantic energy is already in place. If you are

     consciously evolving, this is a righteously profound path with integration of

     mind-body-spirit as a step along the way. Care to join a fellow explorer?

 

*

 

 

THE POINT:

 

In The History of The Great Light Huai-Nan-Tzu presents his teachings in the paradoxical method adopted by Lao-Tzu in The Simple Way, using as illustrations the common things of everyday life, suggesting, by means of contrast and analogy, the inner realities of Tao, the balance of the masculine and the feminine, the balance of the light and the dark, and the sublime virtues of the soul when it is united to Tao. Thus the moral of the teachings is within the comprehension of the most simple, while the mode of life which they advocate may be practised by all. Their very simplicity, however, veils an inner depth of meaning which can only be fully revealed when union with Tao has been attained.

 

The aim of Taoist teachings is to free man from attachments to all that is transient, thus enabling him both to use and to enjoy all things to the fullest possible extent by assigning them to their proper place in his life.

A body kept fit and healthy by proper exercise and diet can, however, help in the accomplishment of the soul's purpose;

But until his spiritual nature is unfolded, man identifies himself with his body and the material world, and these obscure his real Self and prevent him from realizing his true nature: thus he is not conscious of his essential immortality.

 

TAO

Wise and balanced people of TAO are always tranquil and without desiring; they are always content, and have no cares. The Sky is their canopy, the Earth is their vehicle, the four seasons give them power. Perfectly free and knowing no restraints, they advance through the Empyrean; moving slowly or quickly as they wish. They cause the rain to sprinkle moisture on the roads and the wind to sweep the dust; lightening serves to drive them when lagging and thunder provides a path where there was none. Above they roam through the vastness of space; below they pass through the Gate of Boundlessness.

 

·        AN ENDING: Abandon all social and egoistic pretenses: they are short-lived, have little profundity, and nothing for our evolution. If you understand force of the female residing within your universal potential, if you can envision why  awakened men and women join, and have the motivation to follow a life-time path of Higher Union, then I want to know you. On the other hand, if you haven’t moved beyond getting your emotions in balance, and way past the stifling and retarding limitations of the economics of sexual politics, please don’t respond to this.

     This is not about ‘candles and moonlit dinners’ or romanticism based only in       

     emotions; this assumes that romantic energy is already in place. If you are

     consciously evolving, this is a righteously profound path with integration of

     mind-body-spirit as a step along the way. Care to join a fellow explorer?